Spring And Winter – William Shakespeare

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Spring And Winter – Poem by William Shakespeare

William ShakespeareWHEN daisies pied and violets blue, 
   And lady-smocks all silver-white, 
And cuckoo-buds of yellow hue 
   Do paint the meadows with delight, 
The cuckoo then, on every tree, 
Mocks married men; for thus sings he, 
   Cuckoo! 
Cuckoo, cuckoo! – O word of fear, 
Unpleasing to a married ear! 

When shepherds pipe on oaten straws, 
   And merry larks are ploughmen‘s clocks, 
When turtles tread, and rooks, and daws, 
   And maidens bleach their summer smocks 
The cuckoo then, on every tree, 
Mocks married men; for thus sings he, 
   Cuckoo! 
Cuckoo, cuckoo! – O word of fear, 
Unpleasing to a married ear! 

About the Poet – William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare was an English poet, playwright, and actor, widely regarded as the greatest writer in the English language and the world’s pre-eminent dramatist.He is often called England’s national poet, and the “Bard of Avon”. His extant works, including collaborations, consist of approximately 38 plays, 154 sonnets, two long narrative poems, and a few other verses, some of uncertain authorship.

Know more about the poet William Shakespeare 

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