Sonnets by William Shakespeare

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Presenting some sonnets written by William Shakespeare, an English poet regarded as the greatest writer in the English

William ShakespeareSonnet 1

From fairest creatures we desire increase, 
That thereby beauty’s rose might never die, 
But as the riper should by time decease, 
His tender heir might bear his memory: 
But thou, contracted to thine own bright eyes, 
Feed’st thy light’st flame with self-substantial fuel, 
Making a famine where abundance lies, 
Thyself thy foe, to thy sweet self too cruel. 
Thou that art now the world’s fresh ornament 
And only herald to the gaudy spring, 
Within thine own bud buriest thy content 
And, tender churl, makest waste in niggarding
Pity the world, or else this glutton be, 
To eat the world’s due, by the grave and thee. 

Sonnet 2

When forty winters shall besiege thy brow, 
And dig deep trenches in thy beauty’s field, 
Thy youth’s proud livery, so gazed on now, 
Will be a tatter’d weed, of small worth held: 
Then being ask’d where all thy beauty lies, 
Where all the treasure of thy lusty days, 
To say, within thine own deep-sunken eyes, 
Were an all-eating shame and thriftless praise. 
How much more praise deserved thy beauty’s use, 
If thou couldst answer ‘This fair child of mine 
Shall sum my count and make my old excuse,’ 
Proving his beauty by succession thine! 
This were to be new made when thou art old, 
And see thy blood warm when thou feel’st it cold. 

Sonnet 40

Take all my loves, my love, yea, take them all:
What hast thou then more than thou hadst before?
No love, my love, that thou mayst true love call—
All mine was thine before thou hadst this more.
Then if for my love thou my love receivest,
I cannot blame thee for my love thou usest;
But yet be blamed if thou this self deceivest
By wilful taste of what thyself refusest.
I do forgive thy robb’ry, gentle thief,
Although thou steal thee all my poverty;
And yet love knows it is a greater grief
To bear love’s wrong than hate’s known injury.
    Lascivious grace, in whom all ill well shows,
    Kill me with spites, yet we must not be foes.

About the Poet – William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare was an English poet, playwright, and actor, widely regarded as the greatest writer in the English language and the world’s pre-eminent dramatist.He is often called England’s national poet, and the “Bard of Avon”. His extant works, including collaborations, consist of approximately 38 plays, 154 sonnets, two long narrative poems, and a few other verses, some of uncertain authorship.

Know more about the poet William Shakespeare 

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